Maybe it is a good idea to close items once they are answered.

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There are several items , that have responses that have nothing to do anymore with the original.
Some posts have 40 or 50 responses where the latest do not contribute anymore.

My suggestion would be: Close / Archive those items so that no one can add anymore, but allow users to read them. It may be there is an answer that is valuable to others.
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Ary Velstra, Expert Trainer

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Posted 5 years ago

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Alex Gooding, Champion

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I strongly disagree with this proposal.

There are only a very small number of threads on the Mindjet forum that have more than 40 posts. In the past two weeks for example, only two threads with more than 40 posts have been active. There are others that pop up from time to time, but I don't believe this number represent a significant problem.

Most of the threads that do appear frequently deal with known recurring bugs or limitations in Mindjet software (for example, excessive CPU use has attracted over 40 responses). These issues often reappear after being "solved" either because the initial answer does not resolve the problem for the original complainant or the solution doesn't work for other users.

The other group of recurring threads are those expressing concerns over Mindjet's introduction of a subscription model and associated issues. By far the biggest thread in this category in recent times has been the one I initiated; however, while this has over 140 responses, I strongly dispute the claim that the latest posts "do not contribute anymore".

Some of the more recent concerns raised on this thread include the status of the Mac version, a question over what happens when licenses expire, the difference between perpetual and subscription licences, concerns that the cost of the new individual subscription is still too high and - of course - continued criticism of the whole subscription model. Whether or not everyone agrees with the sentiment expressed in these posts, these continue to be valid issues for many users, as demonstrated by the number of responses around these themes.

However, while I have been strongly critical of both Mindjet's subscription model and the way it was introduced, I do think it is to the company's great credit that they have not attempted to censor the concerns raised by me and many other users. No matter how strident the comments, they have refrained from either deleting these threads or closing and archiving them.

Indeed, Mindjet seem to have taken the mature view that those who dislike the content of these threads are capable of choosing not to read them. I think this very sound advice.
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Ary Velstra, Expert Trainer

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I had no censorship in mind, I just think it is a good idea to have posts about One subject and not have them cluttered with other idea's or remarks - how great they may be- Btw @Alexsg: your example where an item about the new Mindjet model gets confused by remarks about the quality of the Mac product etc. is proof of that.

And now I make the same mistake....... write about other subjects in my post. ;-)

I am just as critical as you about the way Mindjet introduced the subscription model. However, I believe a susbcription model allows a company like Mindjet to focus on the latest version of their productline. And they can continue improving the product during the year so we don't have to wait for extra features and functionality. That is a benefit for me and my customers.

Ofcourse one can discuss the pricelevel of such a subscription model. I always ask myself: "how many hours do I save for my customers because I am using Mindjet?".. In my case this saves me and my customers about 3-5 hours per week. Even at the going rates during this crisis-period, this supports my decision to enjoy and promote Mindjet.
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Alex Gooding, Champion

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Ary, I apologise if my response seemed a bit strong.

However, as the originator of the thread on the new subscription model I don't believe the subsequent posts regarding the quality of the Mac version were irrelevant.

I think Mac users were raising the question of whether they would be getting the same value for money as PC users out of the switch to an all-inclusive one-size-fits-all but more expensive subscription model, given the limitations of the Mac version. These are valid concerns and are part of the wider debate regarding Mindjet's subscription strategy.

As you indicate we are in agreement about the way in which Mindjet introduced the new model. However I think the questions of whether the subscription model offers reasonable value or, more broadly, whether Mindjet should have moved in this direction at all are still open for debate.

In terms of value for money, it is interesting to compare Microsoft's subscription pricing to Mindjet's. I'll discuss this in more detail on the subscription model thread (and my own website), but in summary the US $100 annual household licence and $150 per user for the Home Premium Office and Small Business Premium respectively compare very favourably with Mindjet's $180 annual charge for new individual subscribers and $360 for business subscribers.

As to the wider question of whether Mindjet (or Microsoft) should have moved to subscription pricing at all, this is also quite contestable. I know of a much smaller company that tried to move some of its modest product range from perpetual licences which cost only about $40 to $60 each to a subscription system. Even though they planned to charge only about $5-$10 annually, the outcry was such that they quickly retreated.

Again I'll go into this in another post, but the company's conclusion based on user feedback was very simple: users hate paying subscriptions for non-cloud software. It wll be very interesting to see if companies like Microsoft and Mindjet can overcome this mindset and if so, how.

Anyway, Merry Christmas and all the best for 2013.